Site Statistics

  • Members: 152,191
  • Logos: 61,913
  • Sales: $2,304,191

The NFC Business Cards are here

admin Wed, 10/31/2012 - 12:34

QR codes on business cards are so last year. The latest technology in business card design is NFC embedded cards.

NFC stands for Near Field Communication. It’s a protocol by which a wireless conversation is conducted between two pieces of closely-held electronics.

When you say your first hello and present your business card, you're offering up a little piece of yourself - but with an NFC card it can be a great big piece.

Embedded in the card is a tiny microchip. When it's touched to a smartphone, the chip asks the phone to do something. Something you've told it to. Perhaps download your portfolio, play music or video, load web pages, maps or apps, save your contact details - the possibilities are endless. Think of it like an enormous, dynamic and exciting third side.

You can order them soon from Moo.com or Vizibility.

Also, check out the greatest business card collection on the internet for creative ideas.

3 Comments

molumen's picture

It's still some sort of niche technology and IMO it will eventually die out (at least in the business card field), since the vast majority of devices out there are not equipped with NFC technology, and the business cards are themselves somewhat archaic and conservative.
QR codes are IMO way better, since their production cost is null (it's printed as any other business card), and it enables you to choose virtually ANY support (you can even make aluminium cards with a QR code engraved on them, and it'll still work, not so with the NFC chip). I successfully use QR codes in business cards, and my clients are very happy with the results, because THEY DON"T HAVE TO PAY EXTRA MONEY for it. It simply sits there on the card, printed along name, addresses and phones. If someone will make use of it, it's a win! If not, then it's OK, since the business card contains all the needed info anyway...

Laurent84's picture

@molumen I think NFC is superior to QR codes. Since NFC chips are embedded into the paper they don't destroy the design of your business card, unlike QR codes. Also once printed, a QR code is unchangeable. NFC chips are rewritable, so they can link to your website, include your vCard or link to any social media page, youtube link.. the options are endless. Todays smartphones come out of the box with NFC, all you need to do is to tap the card on the phone. QR codes need an extra software to be downloaded, and the scanning process can be problematic at low light. I saw business cards with QR codes that didn't worked at all because of too low resolution.

molumen's picture

I cannot agree with you on all your statement Laurent.
- Yes, NFC chips are embedded in the paper, but what if I want the paper to be cut in a special way (round business card, a hole in the center, a material other than paper)? The choice of materials (paper) is very limited if you dcide to go for NFC cards.
- QR code are unchangeable and NFC chips are re-writable, sure, but does it really is a plus in the context of a business card, a piece of paper that you give away? It's not like you will take the card back from the person and tell him "I'll take that card and bring it back to you with updated info on the chip". So re-writability is not very relevant here.

NFC is a great digital tagging technology, it will definitely be VERY popular in the few years to come in for example retail stores (products descriptions) and other fields, but IMO it is not the greatest thing for business cards since it brings design limitations, and a higher price. The business card is a simple thing, an homage to a vintage business tradition. If I want to give my contacts/links/photos/files to anyone, I can simply use BUMP (http://bu.mp/company/) or share it through Dropbox, or simply e-mail it..

Get Inbox Inspiration

Sign up for the latest branding inspiration, industry news, and logo design tips & resources. Join thousands of designers and branding experts who stay inspired with our monthly newsletter.