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Branding Rules: 14 Brand Secrets From Industry Experts

Chris Dickman Fri, 02/21/2014 - 08:25

Marketing consulting and services firm Vocus recently pointed us to a short eBook it created, providing the responses from fourteen well-known marketers and authors when posed the question, "If you could impart only one piece of branding advice, what would it be?" That focus resulted in contributions which, while not always novel, deliver value from the breadth of their collective insights. We've provided five of these below, with the complete collection available for download on the Vocus site.



Chris Brogan says that branding is related to an upholding of principles, which for him consists of one rule:

In context, Chris’ remarks highlight how brands succeed and fall based on their reputations for delivering on a promise. This promise could be based on product performance, delivery of goods, services, customer experience or care. Good brands deliver, and in best-case scenarios, over-deliver – always putting the customer first. Bad ones share a promise, under-deliver and generally fail.

Chris Brogan, CEO and President, Human Business Works

C.C. Chapman, author of “Amazing Things Will Happen”, says something similar but adds that businesses shouldn’t focus too much on what their competitors are doing. Businesses have to spend more time concentrating on themselves, their opportunities, their issues and their own house:

C.C. Chapman, Chief Marketing Officer, YSN

Chris Lester of CHIEF echoes Chapman. He says that powerful brands come from within, not from without:

Chris Lester, Co-founder, CHIEF Brand Strategy

Selma Bouhl, vice president of marketing strategy and creative, and Seth Spiro, director of brand marketing and advertising at the American Red Cross say that branding is something that starts internally but is expressed externally:

Applying Bouhl and Spiro’s principle, word of mouth begins when people have their needs met. When results are mixed with character values, a brand stands out. People begin to have an emotional reaction when they see and hear about the brand. That’s how strong brands are built, and why people feel compelled to talk about them.

Selma Bouhl and Seth Spiro, The American Red Cross

Pamela Mulder Ratti follows in Howe and Chapman’s veins but examines branding through the lens of maintaining a healthy body and mind:

Pamela Mulder Ratti, President, Fadeproof